Raneh Falls Photos Entry Fee Khajuraho Distance Ken RiverIntroduction:

Google search Khajuraho and you will find a plethora of erotic images and it being called the Kama Sutra capital of the world. Truth be told, of the many thousands of sculptures adorning the walls of Khajuraho, only 10 % of the statues are erotic. But as far as marketing gimmicks go, it can be called the Kama Sutra capital of the world. Khajuraho is derived from Kharjhur (Dates in Sanskrit) and Vahak (Bearer in Sanskrit). It is a remotely accessible town in Madhya Pradesh, central India that is usually swarming with tourists hoping to catch a glimpse of erotica on temple walls.

History:

Legend has it that the first ruler of the Chandela dynasty, Chandravarman, was born out-of-wedlock to a beautiful damsel named Hemvati and the Moon god. Hemvati, who was seduced by the Moon god, was worried for their child after the Moon god would return to his abode. As repentance, the god blessed their child and it is believed that this blessing caused the young Chandravarman to become strong enough to fight lions and tigers with his bare hands by the age of 16. He is also believed to have received a touch stone through

which he could turn iron into gold. He was installed the king of Khajuraho and founded the Chandela dynasty; and after his mother’s death he also began the construction of 85 temples at Khajuraho to wash away her sin.

Chandela Dynasty Lion Symbol Khajuraho
Man fighting a lion – The Chandela symbol

Mythical legends apart, Chandelas, starting from Nanuk in the 9th Century AD, were vassals to the Pratihara dynasty which is credited with withstanding the attacks of muslim rulers from the middle east. The Chandelas under Yashovarman Chandel declared themselves independent with the weakening of their overlords in the tenth century. They also attributed their lineage to the legend of Chandravarma to gain some divine link to the origin of their dynasty. They were great patrons of art and architecture and the temples at Khajuraho, Mahoba and Kalinjar stand testament to their passion.

Best season to visit:

Summers are as hot as hot goes and the temperatures soar up to unbearable levels. The rainy season starts from June and goes on till August. Any time between Mid-June to February is a good time to visit. The Khajuraho dance festival is usually held sometime in February which is a good time to visit.

How to reach:

Khajuraho is, as described earlier, not very easily accessible, the best option that we found was to travel by bus. Buses are available from Jhansi, which is in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh, and also from Chhatarpur which co-incidentally is also the name of the district that Khajuraho is in. Buses from Jhansi to Chhatarpur are also available throughout the day, we travelled in one at 5 in the morning.The journey from Jhansi to Chhatarpur takes approximately 3.5 hours. The buses from Chhatarpur travel at random times with the earliest starting from 8.30 in the morning. The journey from Chhatarpur to Khajuraho takes about 1 hour. Do not expect a Multi-axle Coach or AC Bus from Chhatarpur. Buses from Jhansi are somewhat better in this aspect, though not AC or Multi-axle again.

Tip: Interstate buses are less frequent, but if it is comfort that you are looking for, you can go for this option. Buses from Chhatarpur usually fill in as many passengers as possible before departure, so you may be delayed.

There is also an airport and a railway station, but the flights and trains are not as frequent as buses.There is one train out of Khajuraho in the evening.

Accommodation:

Try to get a hotel as close as possible to the Western group of temples. We stayed at Hotel Isabel Palace which was around 1.5 Kms away from the Western group of temples. A hotel that is closer to the main road would be better as there would be no issues in commuting. Khajuraho has a number of good hotels across the price-spectrum and you can easily find one in your budget.

Food:

Khajuraho receives a number of tourists including foreigners and can cater to a variety of cuisines – Indian, Italian, Lebanese and Mexican. There is a lot of street food as well, but we would strongly advise that you stay away from most street outlets unless you are used to eating street food. Choose a room with complimentary breakfast so you do not waste time searching for food.

Tip: Stay away from this Agarwal Bhojanalay, a restaurant in a narrow lane that serves the worst food ever, period.

Transport:

To visit locations you will need a(n) Auto-rickshaw/Tempo/Trickshaw with a driver. It is cheaper to hire one of these than hiring a taxi, but beware the heat. If the weather is really good, you could also opt for a bicycle. The best way is to ask your hotel to help you out initially, a half-day trip to Raneh Falls and Ken Gharial sanctuary costs around 600 INR by a Trickshaw (also called an onomatopoeic ‘Tuktuk’). We coupled it with a visit to the Eastern and Jain groups of temples and it cost us 800 INR. To visit the Western group of temples, it is better to pay for a one way drop service rather than book a two-way taxi. Transport is easily available most times of the day and the rates are very reasonable.

Sights and places to see:

Khajuraho map.jpg

There are three main groups of temples – Western group, Eastern group and Jain group of temples. The Western group of temples is the more densely templed region. To the east lie the Eastern group of temples (DUH!!!) and to their south lie the Jain temples. Also, Khajuraho is a base for many wanting to travel to Panna National Park.

For an offbeat place, try the Raneh falls with Ken Gharial sanctuary, we went there late afternoon and we were amazed by the sunlight bouncing off the colourful rocks and deep canyons. The entry fee to these two places depends on your mode of transport and number of people. The rate for a Tuktuk is 400 INR for 2 Indians, expect to pay slightly more if you cannot bargain.

15 kilometres to the north of Khajuraho are the Raneh falls on the river Ken; the dam upstream means the falls remain dry throughout the Summer and most of Spring. This would be the best time to visit to see colourful rocks, alternately if you wish to see water gushing down torrentially, try the months of July and August.

Our guide gave us a crash-course in Geology – about Igneous, Metamorphic, Basalt, Sedimentary and Granite rocks – the five types of rocks that are found here. He claimed that this was the longest canyon after the Grand Canyon, but the one at Gandikota seemed bigger and longer than this. The sheer depth of the river gives one an idea of the mightiness of the river Ken and its inordinate taming by this canyon. He talked about a flood that they had experienced a few years before when the river flooded the surrounding areas and rose above the platforms where we stood.

Raneh Falls Ken River Gharial Khajuraho
The mouth of the Raneh Falls at Khajuraho

The waters below are filled with many crocodiles and a few Gharials, a critically endangered species of crocodile native to northern India. Gharials are supposedly harmless and do not attack humans. If you visit in the evening, you can spot a crocodile or two basking in the sun having enjoyed its meal.

The Ken Gharial sanctuary lets you test the harmlessness of Gharials by allowing you to take a boat ride in its waters. 3 kilometres in the jungle, riding through a jungle path, for 50 INR, you can enjoy a short boat ride in its reptile-populated waters. Although we were unable to see any crocodiles, except from far (as is evident from the fact that we’re still alive), it is quite an experience to actually fear this boat ride, but take this ride just for the thrill of it and do remember to tip the boatman well.

Boat Ride Raneh Falls Khajuraho Ken Gharial Sanctuary
That small, dilapidated yellow boat was what we rode on the mighty river of crocodiles and Gharials

Tip: To see these reptiles, make sure you are there before the sun starts being scorchingly hot, maybe around 9 AM, or try the late afternoon when a few venture out.

It was hot when we visited and we were exhausted, but the return journey turned out to be very exciting when we started spotting a lot of Nilgai, spotted deer and foxes. Truth be told, we have been to a number of national parks, but never have we seen so many animals. Be sure to have a good camera ready.

Deer Raneh Falls Khajuraho
Spotting a spotted deer near the Raneh Falls was easy

Khajuraho light and sound show:

It is customary for us to start a tour of a place with a light and sound show about its history. The timings of the show change with seasons; in the summer, there are two shows – one in English which starts at 7.30 PM and the other in Hindi which starts at 8.30 PM- both in the campus of the Western group of temples. The show is quite long and there are some moderately comfortable chairs for the 200 INR that you pay per person. For those without an interest in History, it becomes an overdose of history; it explains the history of Khajuraho and the Chandela dynasty in a somewhat monotonous manner, but in excruciating detail. We suggest skipping this if you have a guide/guidebook. We also had no difficulty securing an auto to drop us to our hotel after our show ended at 8.30 PM.

Adivart Tribal Art museum:

An unexplored gem, this museum hardly gets any attention, but is definitely worth a visit. We were not allowed to take any photographs inside, but the musical instruments in there are a sight to see. It was somewhat difficult for us to find; it is to the north-east of the western group of temples. This is a must-visit site that has helped showcase the customs of the local people that can only be found in the villages of this region.

Eastern group of temples:

The Eastern group is away from the hustle and bustle of the Western group. There are 4 main temples in this group – Vamana temple, Brahma temple, Javari temple and Ghantai temple. We did not visit the Brahma and Ghantai temples; we were short on time as we had spent most of our time at Ken Gharial sanctuary. The Brahma temple is one of the few temples at Khajuraho to have been built with granite.

Vamana Temple Khajuraho Dwarf Temple Travel
The Vamana Temple actually dwarfs the onlooker

The Vamana temple is dedicated to the dwarf Vamana avatar of the Hindu god, Lord Vishnu; it is located near a lush green field. There is a Shikhara (spire) with a sanctum containing statues of Brahma and Vishnu in addition to a four-armed statue of Vamana; the temple walls are adorned with numerous sculptures of Surasundaris (celestial beauties). The entire temple is on an elevated platform that is around two metres high.

Vamana Temple Khajuraho Travel
The entrance to the Vamana Temple

The Shikhara has been intricately carved inch by inch and the attention paid to detail is spectacular, this is what makes each of these temples special. The quality of work done by these artisans from the former century is simply unmatchable and its replication cannot be even thought about it now.

Javari temple is to the south of the Vamana temple and is much smaller than it (ironically) but in no way, inferior. The origin of the name is still not clear as no Hindu god can be attributed to the name Javari. Hence, archaeologists are of the opinion that Javari Temple was built by a noble rather than a king who would have chosen the name of a god for the temple.

Javari Temple Khajuraho Makaratorana
The Javari temple at Khajuraho with its Makaratorana

The highlight of this temple is the Makaratorana which is basically a gateway (Torana) with dragon or crocodile (Makara) scupltures. Makaras are considered protectors of doorways and thresholds and are usually found on doorways or arches at the entrance of Hindu temples. The ceiling at the entrance just behind the archway reminded us of the Dilwara temples at Mount Abu.

The distinguishing feature of this temple is that it does not have a Pradakshinapath (path to circambulate the temple or sanctum) which is a common feature in Hindu temples. It is said that this temple resembles the Chaturbhuj temple at Khajuraho, hence we did not visit the Chaturbhuj temple.

Coming on over to the reason why people visit Khajuraho in the first place – the Western group of temples. The main temples here are the Lakshmana temple, Kandariya Mahadev temple  and Matangeshwar temple. The entry fee is a paltry 10 INR if you are an Indian (5 USD otherwise). We opted for an Audio guide as the human guides were a bit too vociferous about the erotic sculptures, which made us slightly uncomfortable; it cost us a paltry 150 INR. The Audio Compass outlet is just to the left after the entry point. Be prepared to roam around a lot on foot, so dab your sunscreens and bring lots of water for rehydration. There is a small kiosk inside the premises, but it does not serve any food besides soft drinks and crackers; however, there are good restaurants outside the complex.

Nandi Statue Khajuraho Temple
The statue of the holy Nandi embellished with miniature figurines

Commanded by our audio guide,we turned left to a Nandi temple, housing a majestic 6-foot tall Nandi, the vehicle of the Hindu god, Lord Shiva; at the base of the statue is the Shesh Nag, a serpent. There are over 600 miniature statues on the Nandi statue and we could literally learn space optimisation and utilisation from this statue.

Just down the path from the Nandi temple is the oldest and very famous Lakshmana temple, dedicated to Lord Vishnu. Vishnu, in his four-armed form, adorns the temple sanctum that is supported by octagonal pillars adorned with smaller sculptures. The insides are very elaborate, although though there is a lack of proper illumination and also some damaged sculptures. But, the lack of illumination also meant that we were shielded from the extreme heat that prevailed outside. The distinguishing feature of this temple is the Shikhara which contains many smaller Shikharas. As the temple complex is on an elevated platform, there is a path around the entire complex containing the Lakshmana and another smaller temple. Sculptures adorn all parts of the walls of the temple, there is a repetitive leaf-pattern on the bottom side with elephants and their mahouts just above them.

Elephants Angry Ferocious Lakshmana Temple Khajuraho Statue
Ferocious elephants stare at you

There was this row of war elephants that really caught our eyes; the ferocity in their eyes was depicted perfectly. This was also our first encounter with erotic sculptures at the Western Group of temples; statues of couples engaged passionately in love-making in different postures of the Kama Sutra, a lady with scratches (hickeys) on her back, were among the few we saw. We even saw the statue of an elephant that had turned its head to watch a couple.

Erotica Lakshmana Temple Khajuraho Kama Sutra
Erotica on the outer walls of the Lakshmana Temple at Khajuraho

If we had to name the best temple in Khajuraho, we would clearly settle for this one – the largest temple of the lot, the Kandariya Mahadev built by king Vidhyadhara, which is dedicated to Lord Shiva. While the sheer magnitude of this temple inspires awe and would cause one to lose track of where one is going, the lack of a clear path does not make things easier. This temple was built by the kind to commemorate his successful defence against the very powerful barbarian, Mahmud of Ghazni.

Kandariya Mahadev Temple Khajuraho Kama Sutra
The lofty Kandariya Mahadev Temple

The elegantly carved Torana at the entrance of the temple was worth the number of steps that we climbed up and the dancers engraved on the Torana seemed to welcome us tired travellers. The structure is highly symmetric and the 100-foot tall Shikhara casts a huge shadow under which we clicked a number of our pictures. The inner sanctum is well-lit in contrast to other temples over here and one can clearly see a white Shivling in the middle.

Acrobatic couples and groups indulging in love-making amongst themselves and a few disturbing sculptures of beastiality are the highlights of the exterior walls of this temple.

Erotica Kandariya Mahadeva Temple Khajuraho Kama Sutra
Three rows of erotica between the balustrades of the Kandariya Mahadev Temple

Chitragupta temple is a comparatively smaller temple, the most striking thing is that there is a depiction of dragon like creatures on the exterior walls. The exact relation of these creatures to the Chinese mythological creatures is yet unknown. The temple is dedicated to the sun-god as is evident from the depiction of his chariot drawn by seven horses. It is also said to resemble the Jagdambi temple (also at Khajuraho).

Chitragupta Temple Khajuraho
The Chitragupta temple at Khajuraho

There also was a lake between the Chitragupta and Kandariya Mahadev temples, which is now covered by a huge lawn instead. A cooler day would have made for a good walk along the lawn. The British archaeologist, Alexander Cunningham, was surprised and even disturbed by the sculptures on the walls depicting a variety of sexual acts and orgies.

Erotica Chitragupta Temple Khajuraho Dragon Kama Sutra
Notice the dragon-like creatures on the walls of the Chitragupta Temple

The last of the age-old temples in the western group is the Vishwanath temple, tired as we were, we proceeded to it through the two small elephant statues at the entrance. Built by the king Dhanga, it is dedicated to Lord Shiva and houses the other Shivling in this complex. Inscriptions reveal that the temple originally had four subsidiary shrines, it was a Panchayatana shrine. However, of these, only two shrines remain today.

Vishwanath Temple Khajuraho Kama Sutra Panchayatana
The Panchayatana Shrine of Shiva at Khajuraho

Inscriptions also reveal that there were two Shivling, one made of Emerald and the other made of stone, both inside the sanctum; of these two, only the stone Shivling remains inside the temple. The doorway, as is in other temples here, is decorated by many figurines of other gods and apsaras.

Vishwanath Temple Lingam Khajuraho Shivling
The stone Shivling at the Vishwanath Temple at Khajuraho

With this we concluded our tour of the Western group of temples. We then exit the complex and went for a short visit to the oldest active site of worship, the Matangeshvara temple.

We have tried detailing most places in Khajuraho, but there are a lot more places left here just waiting to be explored, so we suggest you explore them yourself and let us know your experience in the comments section.

One question remains unanswered though – Why would a house of worship depict erotic images on its walls? One theory is that these temples were built during the time of the Tantrics who believed that Hedonism and indulgence in worldly activities would lead them to god. Another revolves around the concept that these were metaphorically placed on the outer walls of temples so as to help one rid oneself of the worldly pleasures before entering the abode of the divine. Another goes to say that in the olden days when students were trained in a Gurukul isolated from society for several years returned, these sculptures acted as a means for them to understand and prepare them for life in a society. As interesting as these theories sound, we never really can be sure or properly understand, but only ponder upon and wander upon.

Khajuraho

118 thoughts on “Khajuraho

  • April 5, 2016 at 16:50
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    nice read

    Reply
  • April 11, 2016 at 14:42
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    Khajuraho seems like a grreat place to visit, we definitely would visit…

    Reply
    • April 13, 2016 at 00:31
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      it indeed is.. you must visit it sometime…

      Reply
  • April 13, 2016 at 12:48
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    I had a virtual tour while reading your blog.
    Nicely put😊😊

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    • April 13, 2016 at 19:16
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      thanks a lot Sandhya… you definitely must have the real one too…

      Reply
  • April 14, 2016 at 12:07
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    Nicely put up man.. very detailed.

    Reply
    • April 14, 2016 at 12:25
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      thanks a lot Parv… hope it helps you anytime you want to visit Khajuraho…

      Reply
  • April 15, 2016 at 03:13
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    Neatly described and informative.Good job yash and tanu:)this time should surely plan for a trip.
    happy blogging.

    Reply
    • April 15, 2016 at 07:13
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      thanks a lot Akks and Baava.
      Ping us if you do want any help in your trip to Khajuraho. You guys should really visit this place, it is close to Lucknow.

      Reply
  • April 15, 2016 at 10:44
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    Great work sir …. Really helpful and precise …

    Reply
    • April 15, 2016 at 11:01
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      Thanks a lot Tary, all credit to us both actually,

      and BTW, this Tarun right??

      Reply
  • April 19, 2016 at 23:03
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    Well written and informative. Well done.

    Reply
    • April 19, 2016 at 23:45
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      Thank you Tamal for your compliment.
      Best of luck with your travel blog.

      Reply
    • April 20, 2016 at 07:19
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      Great, plan a trip down here and let us know if you need help. We also got a post about Orchha in the making. Hope to see you soon fellow travel blogger…

      Reply
  • April 20, 2016 at 03:28
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    Wow great pictures! I feel like I was really there. My girlfriend and I love traveling and we used to have the Southwest companion pass (Basically buy one southwest airline ticket, get one free). Maybe one day we will be able to see what you posted in person!

    Reply
    • April 20, 2016 at 07:12
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      You definitely must. If you do need any help, let us know.
      We are in the process of drafting a post for Orchha. Follow us to get an update on the post.

      Reply
    • May 4, 2016 at 11:53
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      thank you for your nice comment… 🙂
      Hope this makes you want to visit Khajuraho…
      Do check our post on Orchha too, it is near Khajuraho…

      Reply
  • May 6, 2016 at 04:43
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    Khajuraho is beautiful. Again, I’m taken by the architecture. The temples look wholly in tact. I imagine only the strongest materials were used. I also suspect the importance of the temples is great, so great care has been taken to preserve them.

    I love the heat, but I wonder is it dry heat? I have traveled to several desert locations here in the US. They are very hot, but the heat is dry, so not so bad as humid.

    I like the way you take time to give tips and tricks in this post. The photography is well thought out, as if planned and choreographed. I know a fellow who would love to look at your maps. They look old, and he would love them. Fascinating to visit this place through your eyes!!!

    Reply
    • May 9, 2016 at 10:45
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      Thank you so much for your very nice comments, Jen. We were experiencing some problems with our internet and hence were unable to reply.
      As for the architecture, since these temples were built in the olden days when they had no Concrete or cement, they used a pattern of interlocking stones which apparently have stood the test of time. Quite amazing, huh!!!!
      As for the conservation part, the remarkable work done by the ASI (Archaeological Survey of India) is commendable considering the amount of funds they have been allotted. Though more education needs to be imparted to the locals who play the most important part in conservation.
      The heat is dry heat, but to an extent, but certainly not humid.
      Thank you for patiently reading each of our posts and commenting on each, we really wish we could have replied earlier.
      And yes, you should definitely visit them. Ping us if you need help in visiting India.
      PS: We are off to check your blog. 🙂

      Reply
  • May 10, 2016 at 19:59
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    I’m amazed at the level of detail provided by you. I’m looking to travel to India in December and this place is on my list. Now upon reading your post, I’m even more excited to travel here
    Could you maybe give me your itinerary? I have left my ID here.

    Reply
    • May 10, 2016 at 21:09
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      Hi Pele,
      Thank you for your comment. Khajuraho is a wonderful place and you should visit it for sure.
      About the itinerary, we are planning to launch another section our blog covering itineraries, probable downloadable content.

      Reply
  • June 7, 2016 at 22:57
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    Very informative! The temples are breathtaking. Thank you for sharing!

    Reply
    • June 8, 2016 at 06:37
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      Glad you enjoyed it. Hope this post makes you want to visit this place.

      Reply
  • June 13, 2016 at 10:55
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    Hello! Great blog, with some fantastic detail. Really like the pictures to bring the writing alive 🙂

    Reply
  • June 24, 2016 at 21:58
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    I enjoyed the reading a lot, very detailed and enjoyable! Wish I could visit the place in person! 🙂

    Reply
    • June 24, 2016 at 22:04
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      Thanks a lot, you really must visit this place. If you ever do need any help planning a trip to Khajuraho, our blog should help you, if you still do need something, do let us know. Happy travelling and blogging!

      Reply
  • Pingback: Orchha – A series of fortunate travels…

    • June 26, 2016 at 13:44
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      I think you would be more interested in where we were just last month. Alleppey on a house boat. But this was a family get together of sorts rather than a tour.
      We are due to visit Assam and Meghalaya in August. Kind of utilising most of our free time in planning the next trip

      Reply
      • June 26, 2016 at 13:54
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        oh wonderful…but u should write about your houseboat trip…unfortunately i haven’t been on one…but would love to know how your experience was?

        Reply
        • June 26, 2016 at 16:49
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          We will try to put up a short piece, but we have very little information about the place.

          Reply
    • June 26, 2016 at 16:49
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      But, it was simply wonderful, a small floating heaven.

      Reply
  • June 26, 2016 at 14:54
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    Woah. I never really knew. This is wonderfully detailed. Hope to see more from this blog. I honestly have never visited the place, but someday maybe.
    Take care and happy writing and visiting. 🙂

    Reply
    • June 26, 2016 at 17:05
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      Thanks a lot Aitijya (Hope this is your name). Just started checking out your blog. The doodle in the homepage is simply superb. And I really appreciate what you are doing. Keep up the good work and stay tuned for more.

      Reply
      • June 26, 2016 at 17:58
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        Aitijya is my name but there are others working with us now. 🙂
        The doodle was actually done by my friend. If you need any artwork done you can let me know, and I’ll get you in touch with him.
        And lastly, thank you. Let us know if you wish to contribute something.
        Take care and good luck for everything.
        I will. I love reading. I’ve followed you. Do not worry I’ll one of the first people to read your blog from now on. Take care.

        Reply
        • June 26, 2016 at 17:59
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          Thanks a lot for everything. 🙂
          And we will think up of something to post on the Wall.

          Reply
          • June 26, 2016 at 18:07
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            Thank you. Means a lot.
            Anything would be fine. As long as it’s real and people could connect with. Sorry for disturbing you guys with so many comments.
            Happy blogging. Bye. 🙂

          • June 26, 2016 at 18:49
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            Yep. Got it.
            And no problem with the comments.

    • June 30, 2016 at 06:40
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      Thank you Rafa. Glad it inspired you to write about your travels, hope it also inspires you to travel here too.
      And we have started checking your blog too.

      Reply
    • July 9, 2016 at 21:53
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      Thanks a lot. Check out our other posts too.

      Reply
  • Pingback: Yogyakarta – A series of fortunate travels…

  • April 17, 2017 at 10:27
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    The pics were very good. I had been wanting to visit this place in India.

    Reply
    • April 17, 2017 at 19:35
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      Thanks Rob, it is a place worth visiting.

      Reply
  • April 29, 2017 at 09:37
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    I’ve never heard of this temple complex, but it looks pretty impressive from the photos! It doesn’t surprise me that marketers make a big bubble out of nothing.
    .. (regarding the erotic figures)

    Reply
    • April 29, 2017 at 09:51
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      Haha, you are spot on about marketers. But the most surprising and enigmatic thing about these temples is the reason why 6th century houses of worship have been adorned by such erotic figures.

      Reply
  • April 29, 2017 at 18:14
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    WOW… I didn’t know about that place. But I added it to my bucket list of places to visit. I loved the mythologic legend, and the building seems so fascinating. Your story has shown perfectly a place full of history (from 9th Century AD), and I am impressed by the sculptures they were able to create at that time. We Westerns should definitely be more informed of Asian history and culture.

    Reply
    • April 29, 2017 at 19:01
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      Yes, it really is quite fascinating what they could achieve so many centuries ago. There is so much erotica adorning the walls of the temple. Truth be told, we Asians are ourselves not too very informed of what we have come from. 😛
      Hope our blog helps you plan your trip.

      Reply
  • April 30, 2017 at 00:32
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    I am planning to make my next trip to MP all about Orccha and Khajurao and you just gave me the “places not to miss in Khajurao” list! 🙂

    Reply
    • April 30, 2017 at 00:55
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      Happy to help. 🙂
      That is what this blog is for.

      Reply
  • April 30, 2017 at 02:57
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    It’s juts like a somebody to enter this site on google as erotic to drive more traffic maybe. The sculptures look amazing the craftmanship that must go into creating something like this is amazing

    Reply
    • May 4, 2017 at 10:21
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      Haha, that traffic part is true, we could try adding more erotic pictures :P.

      Reply
  • April 30, 2017 at 04:40
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    Looks amazing thanks for all the informative advice!

    Reply
    • May 10, 2017 at 19:25
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      Thanks Wahyuni, it is a great place to visit.

      Reply
  • May 13, 2017 at 07:11
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    Thanks for shedding some great light on a famous, yet misunderstood place. This looks like a place i absolutely must visit!

    Reply
    • May 13, 2017 at 08:39
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      Yes, it really is a misunderstood place, if you do decide to come to India, keep this place in your list.

      Reply
  • May 13, 2017 at 16:31
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    I felt like I was with you while I was reading! Nice pics and nice description!

    Reply
    • May 13, 2017 at 20:00
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      Haha… Thanks a lot for your wonderful comment, glad you enjoyed it.

      Reply
  • May 13, 2017 at 21:15
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    I had no idea that this place existed. I love the way you added the legend into your post. It adds a lot of depth and gives so much more understanding to the place that you are reading about.

    Reply
    • May 13, 2017 at 22:22
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      Thanks, this place is quite famous among foreign tourists to India.
      About the history part, actually the history is what drives us to visit these places.

      Reply
  • May 14, 2017 at 11:49
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    Khajuraho temple is one of a kind in the entire world. It’s a marvel of human ingenious. Thanks for the map, it is so huge, it will really help one plan and explore every nook and corner of the heritage

    Reply
    • May 14, 2017 at 12:07
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      Yes, it will take you two full days for covering all the places.

      Reply
  • May 16, 2017 at 21:03
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    This is a huge post but worth it to read. Some really invaluable information about this destination. 🙂 Proud of our heritage.

    Reply
    • May 17, 2017 at 19:40
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      Thanks a lot Deepak.
      Yes, I too am proud that we have this gem in our country.

      Reply
    • May 17, 2017 at 19:42
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      Hi, you may also be interested in reading our Orchha post. I see you have a pic of Lakshminarayan Mandir on your blog.
      How did you find our blog anyway?

      Reply
      • May 17, 2017 at 21:14
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        Looking for some travel blogs and I stumbled upon your blog after all it is a small world:)

        Reply
    • June 16, 2017 at 20:46
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      It really is breathtaking. Thanks for stopping by.

      Reply
    • June 16, 2017 at 22:16
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      Yes. The attention to detail is simply amazing.

      Reply
  • June 17, 2017 at 14:56
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    You have clearly elucidated how Khajuraho is so much more than just erotic sculptures. The impressive architectural prowess and artistry of the past is evident all over these temples.

    Reply
    • June 17, 2017 at 16:46
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      You are spot-on is saying that. Kind of why we also have Raneh falls as the Background Image.

      Reply
  • June 18, 2017 at 15:32
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    Looks like one more place worth visiting. India is truly endless.

    Reply
    • June 18, 2017 at 17:10
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      It indeed is, imagine a sixth century temple depicting erotica. Mind-blowing!

      Reply
  • June 23, 2017 at 20:50
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    No doubt, india is a place of exploration! You marked a more interesting in my travelogue list. Thankyou for the article.🙂

    Reply
  • June 24, 2017 at 03:56
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    This was so informative! Thanks for a great post 🙂

    Reply
    • June 24, 2017 at 20:15
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      Thanks you so much for your kind words. 🙂

      Reply
  • June 24, 2017 at 20:40
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    We’d love to explore this place, it looks like perfect for our standard. The photos are so inviting and show the beauty of this place. Good post!!

    Reply
    • June 24, 2017 at 20:42
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      Khajuraho is a great place. We would go back there someday just to cover a few of the temples that we have missed here.

      Reply
    • June 28, 2017 at 20:52
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      It is unbelievable what they could do so many centuries ago.

      Reply
  • June 28, 2017 at 20:38
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    What a well written post. It was so informative and the pictures are amazing. Thanks for sharing!

    Reply
    • June 28, 2017 at 20:52
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      Do contact us if you need any help planning a trip.

      Reply
    • June 28, 2017 at 23:07
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      Thanks.
      Well then, hope our blog helps you plan your trip.

      Reply
  • June 28, 2017 at 21:12
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    The images in the temples are amazing. I definitely hope to visit one day. Your post was very detailed with great information.#lovetotravel- blackgirlzen.com

    Reply
    • June 28, 2017 at 23:08
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      Those temples are something, aren’t they?

      Reply
  • June 28, 2017 at 21:13
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    Very interesting. I had never heard of any of this before. Thanks for sharing.

    Reply
  • June 29, 2017 at 02:55
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    What a detailed post! Reading this led me to adding it to my bucket list of places to visit! Thank you for this amazing post and the great pictures!

    Reply
    • June 29, 2017 at 07:45
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      Reading your comment made our day. 🙂
      This is exactly what we intended.

      Reply
  • June 29, 2017 at 06:06
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    This is a really amazing post. Khajuraho seems like a great place to visit.

    Reply
  • June 29, 2017 at 14:52
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    Good information put together. Your collection of pictures are so good.

    Reply
  • June 30, 2017 at 08:41
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    This is a nice post. It looks very hot there and although the sights may be breath taking, I do not like very hot weather. So i would have to pass on going on this trip. It is a beautiful spread of photos and a very well written article. Kudos

    Reply
    • June 30, 2017 at 22:38
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      Yep, it was HOT and humid too. Thank god we had our air-conditioned car to help us through the trip. If you do change your mind about the heat, this should top your list of places to visit.

      Reply
  • August 3, 2017 at 22:29
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    I love when blog posts make me search new destinations – and this surely did! We haven’t ever seen to India, but its amazing to see how amazing the landscape is there! You never really see any pictures of this so this is a great post!

    Reply
    • August 3, 2017 at 23:09
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      Thank you.
      Khajuraho is truly a miracle considering that they had erotica sculpted on the walls in the sixth century. This is something that cannot even be imagined today and having that more than a thousand years ago is why Khajuraho, the erotic capital of the world a thousand years ago is a miracle.

      Reply
  • September 2, 2017 at 16:51
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    I was a student of archaeology department of Jahangirnagar University in Dhaka, in my student life I read about this temple, really very pleased to see the article. Nicely done.

    Reply
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